Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies

v3.7.0.1
Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies
6 Months Ended
Jun. 30, 2017
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies

1. Basis of Presentation and Significant Accounting Policies


Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation


The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“U.S. GAAP”) for interim financial reporting. However, certain information or footnote disclosures normally included in complete financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP have been condensed, or omitted, pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). In the opinion of the Company’s management, the unaudited consolidated financial statements in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q include all normal and recurring adjustments necessary for the fair statement of the results for the interim periods presented. The results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any other interim period or for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2017.


The consolidated financial statements as of and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 included in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q are unaudited. The balance sheet as of December 31, 2016 is derived from the audited consolidated financial statements as of that date. The accompanying unaudited consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the audited consolidated financial statements and related notes, together with Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, contained in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2016 filed with the SEC on March 31, 2017 (the “2016 Annual Report”).


On April 28, 2017, the Company completed the acquisition of an 80% controlling interest in Pelican Therapeutics, Inc.(“Pelican”), a related party prior to acquisition. Operations of Pelican are included in the consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive loss from the acquisition date.  In October 2016, the Company formed a wholly-owned subsidiary, Zolovax, Inc. to focus on the development of gp96-based vaccines initially targeting Zika with the ability to target HIV, West Nile dengue and yellow fever, among others.


The accompanying consolidated financial statements as of and for the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 and 2016 include the accounts of Heat Biologics, Inc. (“the Company”), and its subsidiaries, Heat Biologics I, Inc. (“Heat I”), Heat Biologics III, Inc. (“Heat III”), Heat Biologics IV, Inc. (“Heat IV”), Heat Biologics GmbH, and Heat Biologics Australia Pty Ltd.  Additionally, as of the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 the accompanying consolidated financials include Zolovax and Pelican. The functional currency of the entities located outside the United States is the applicable local currency (the foreign entities). Assets and liabilities of the foreign entities are translated at period-end exchange rates.  Statement of operations accounts are translated at the average exchange rate during the period.  The effects of foreign currency translation adjustments are included in other comprehensive loss, which is a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss in stockholders’ equity. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. At December 31, 2016 and June 30, 2017, the Company held a 92.5% controlling interest in Heat I and at June 30, 2017, Heat held an 80% controlling interest in Pelican. All other subsidiaries are wholly owned. For the three and six months ended June 30, 2017 the Company recognized $75,715 and $126,506 in non-controlling interest for Heat I, respectively and since the April 28, 2017 acquisition of Pelican the Company recognized $14,450 in non-controlling interest for Pelican for the same period. The Company accounts for its less than 100% interest in these subsidiaries in the consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Accordingly, the Company presents non-controlling interests as a component of stockholders’ equity on its consolidated balance sheets and reports non-controlling interest net loss under the heading “net loss – non-controlling interest” in the consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive loss.


The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared on a going concern basis. The Company has an accumulated deficit of approximately $63.4 million as of June 30, 2017 and a net loss of approximately $6.5 million for the six months ended June 30, 2017, and has not generated significant revenue or positive cash flows from operations. These factors raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern within one year after the financial statements are issued. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or amounts of liabilities that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty. To meet its capital needs, the Company is considering multiple alternatives, including, but not limited to, additional equity financings (including through the “at-the-market” Issuance Sales Agreement, the “FBR Sales Agreement” that it entered into with FBR Capital Markets & Co. (“FBR”) in August 2016), debt financings, partnerships, collaborations and other funding transactions. There can be no assurance that the Company will be able to meet the requirements for use of the FBR Sales Agreement or to complete any such transactions on acceptable terms or otherwise. On April 28, 2017, the acquisition of an 80% controlling interest in Pelican, a related party prior to acquisition, was completed. Pelican has been awarded a $15.2 million grant to fund preclinical and some clinical activities from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (“CPRIT”). The CPRIT grant is subject to customary CPRIT funding conditions. The Company believes the acquisition aligns its strategic focus and strengthens its position in the T cell activation arena.  If the Company is unable to obtain the necessary capital required to maintain operations, it will need to pursue a plan to license or sell its assets, seek to be acquired by another entity and/or cease operations.


Revenue Recognition


The Company’s main source of revenue is grant revenue related to a $15.2 million research grant received from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (“CPRIT”), covering a three-year period from June 1, 2016 through May 31, 2019. Grant revenue is recognized when qualifying costs are incurred and there is reasonable assurance that the conditions of the award have been met for collection. Proceeds received prior to the costs being incurred or the conditions of the award being met are recognized as deferred revenue until the services are performed and the conditions of the award are met (see Note 9).


Business Combinations


We account for acquisitions using the acquisition method of accounting, which requires that all identifiable assets acquired and liabilities assumed be recorded at their estimated fair values. The excess of the fair value of purchase consideration over the fair values of identifiable assets and liabilities is recorded as goodwill. When determining the fair values of assets acquired and liabilities assumed, management makes significant estimates and assumptions.

 

Critical estimates in valuing certain intangible assets include but are not limited to future expected cash flows from acquired patented technology. Management’s estimates of fair value are based upon assumptions believed to be reasonable, but are inherently uncertain and unpredictable and, as a result, actual results may differ from estimates. Other estimates associated with the accounting for acquisitions may change as additional information becomes available regarding the assets acquired and liabilities assumed (see Note 2).


Goodwill and In-Process Research and Development


We classify intangible assets into three categories: (1) intangible assets with definite lives subject to amortization, (2) intangible assets with indefinite lives not subject to amortization and (3) goodwill. We determine the useful lives of definite-lived intangible assets after considering specific facts and circumstances related to each intangible asset. Factors we consider when determining useful lives include the contractual term of any agreement related to the asset, the historical performance of the asset, and other economic facts; including competition and specific market conditions. Intangible assets that are deemed to have definite lives are amortized, primarily on a straight-line basis, over their estimated useful lives.

 

Intangible assets that are deemed to have indefinite lives, including goodwill, are reviewed for impairment annually, or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the asset might be impaired. The impairment test for indefinite-lived intangibles, other than goodwill, consists of a comparison of the fair value of the intangible asset with its carrying amount. If the carrying amount exceeds the fair value, an impairment charge is recognized in an amount equal to that excess.

 

Indefinite-lived intangible assets, such as goodwill, are not amortized. The Company will test the carrying amounts of goodwill for recoverability on an annual basis or when events or changes in circumstances indicate evidence a potential impairment exists, using a fair value based test. No impairment existed at June 30, 2017.

 

In-process research and development, or IPR&D, assets are considered to be indefinite-lived until the completion or abandonment of the associated research and development projects. IPR&D assets represent the fair value assigned to technologies that we acquire, which at the time of acquisition have not reached technological feasibility and have no alternative future use. During the period that the assets are considered indefinite-lived, they are tested for impairment on an annual basis, or more frequently if we become aware of any events occurring or changes in circumstances that indicate that the fair value of the IPR&D assets are less than their carrying amounts. If and when development is complete, which generally occurs upon regulatory approval and the ability to commercialize products associated with the IPR&D assets, these assets are then deemed definite-lived and are amortized based on their estimated useful lives at that point in time. If development is terminated or abandoned, we may have a full or partial impairment charge related to the IPR&D assets, calculated as the excess of carrying value of the IPR&D assets over fair value (see Note 5).


Contingent Consideration

 

Consideration paid in a business combination may include potential future payments that are contingent upon the acquired business achieving certain levels of earnings in the future (“contingent consideration”). Contingent consideration liabilities are measured at their estimated fair value as of the date of acquisition, with subsequent changes in fair value recorded in the consolidated statements of operations. The Company estimates the fair value of the contingent consideration as of the acquisition date using the estimated future cash outflows based on the probability of meeting future milestones. The milestone payments will be made upon the achievement of clinical and commercialization milestones as well as single low digit royalty payments and payments upon receipt of sublicensing income. Subsequent to the date of acquisition, we reassess the actual consideration earned and the probability-weighted future earn-out payments at each balance sheet date. Any adjustment to the contingent consideration liability will be recorded in the consolidated statements of operations. Contingent consideration liabilities are presented in long-term liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets (see Note 2).

 

Income Taxes.

 

We account for income taxes using the asset and liability method, which requires recognition of deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of events that have been included in the financial statements. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are determined based on the difference between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities, using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent that utilization is not presently more likely than not.


Significant Accounting Policies


The significant accounting policies used in preparation of these interim financial statements are disclosed in the Company's Form 10-K, and have not changed significantly since such filing.


Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements


In May 2017, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2017-09, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Scope of Modification Accounting (ASU 2017-09).  This ASU provides that an entity should account for the effects of a modification unless the fair value, the vesting conditions of the modified award and the classification of the modified award (equity or liability instrument) are the same as the original award immediately before the modification. The provisions of this ASU are effective for years beginning after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted. The Company plans to adopt this standard in the third quarter of 2017 and does not expect it to have significant impact to the Company’s consolidated financial statements.


In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment (Topic 350). This standard eliminates Step 2 from the goodwill impairment test, instead requiring an entity to recognize a goodwill impairment charge for the amount by which the goodwill carrying amount exceeds the reporting unit’s fair value. This guidance is effective for interim and annual goodwill impairment tests in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019 with early adoption permitted. This guidance must be applied on a prospective basis. The Company chose to adopt this standard beginning the third quarter of 2017. The Company does not believe the early adoption will have an impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805) to clarify the definition of a business, which is fundamental in the determination of whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses combinations. The updated guidance requires that in order to be considered a business the integrated set of assets and activities acquired must include, at a minimum, an input and process that contribute to the ability to create output. If substantially all of the fair value of the assets acquired is concentrated in a single identifiable asset or group of similar assets, it is not considered a business, and therefore would not be considered a business combination. The update is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods with fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted. The Company adopted this standard in its acquisition of Pelican.


In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718): Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting (ASU 2016-09).  Under ASU 2016-09, the tax effects of stock compensation will be recognized as income tax expense or benefit to the Company’s income statement and the tax effects of exercised or vested awards will be treated as discrete items in the reporting period in which they occur. Along with other income tax cash flows, excess tax benefits will be classified as operating activities, and cash paid by the Company when directly withholding shares for tax withholding purposes will be classified as financing activities. The Company has elected to continue to account for forfeitures when they occur. The adoption of ASU 2016-09 did not have a material impact to the Company’s consolidated financial statements.


In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), requiring lessees to recognize for all leases (with the exception of short-term leases) at the commencement date: (1) a lease liability, which is a lessee’s obligation to make lease payments arising from a lease, measured on a discounted basis, and (2) a right-of-use (“ROU”) asset, which is an asset that represents the lessee’s right to use, or control the use of, a specified asset for the lease term. The update is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. The Company currently anticipates that upon adoption of the new standard, ROU assets and lease liabilities will be recognized in amounts that will be immaterial to the consolidated balance sheets.

 

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (ASU 2014-09), which requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. The ASU will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. GAAP when it becomes effective. In July 2015, the FASB voted to defer the effective date of the new standard until fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017 with early application permitted for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016.  Due to insignificant revenue to date, we do not believe the adoption of the standard will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.